Playlists Based Off My Summer Reads

Sadly summer is drawing to a close. I’m packing up all my things and getting ready to move into a new house in Athens. I’m really excited about starting back to school again this August, but I’m even more excited to finally get to see all my friends again!

The only way I manage to make it through the three hour drive from Asheville to Athens is either listening to music or podcasts. Luckily I’ve made three in anticipation of next week’s travels, and they’re all based off books I read this summer.

To check out each playlist, click on the title of each book and you’ll be linked directly to my playlist on Spotify.

Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail by Cheryl Strayed

The Casual Vacancy by J. K. Rowling (check out my book review HERE)

The All Souls Trilogy by Deborah Harkness

Here’s my running list of books read this summer:

Brisinger by Christopher Paolini

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? [Blade Runner] by Philip K. Dick

The Vagina Monologues by Eve Ensler

The Goldfinch by Donna Tart

The Great Passage by Shion Miura

The Sound and the Fury by William Faulkner

My Life on the Road by Gloria Steinem

Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Harriet Jacobs

The Casual Vacancy by J. K. Rowling

1984 by George Orwell

A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness

Persepolis: The Story of a Childhood by Marjane Satrapi

The Complete Maus by Art Spiegelman

Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail by Cheryl Strayed

Shadow of Night by Deborah Harkness

The Color Purple by Alice Walker

Currently reading The Book of Life by Deborah Harkness

For more updates on the books I read check out my Goodreads account right HERE. I don’t read as much during the school year, but I do leave ratings on all the books I read and if they’re really great (or really, really terrible) I leave a review.

What are your favorite songs of the summer? Have you read anything good?

xo Bailey

The Casual Vacancy by J.K. Rowling

Whenever I go to the beach I make sure to bring enough books to read. This summer, however, I knew I had a goal of twelve books as well as the May, June, and July books for the bookclub I’m in. That’s fifteen books for an entire summer, over half of what I usually read per year! Usually I have a daunting to-read list, but I didn’t know where to start this time.

I started off the summer with The Goldfinch, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, and the Inheritance Cycle. After that, I hit a wall. I spent a lot of my downtime at work surfing through Twitter instead of reading. Politics, even though I dislike them, have been interesting this year. Its like reality tv with all the drama and he-said-she-said gossip going on. That’s when I decided a book on small town politics might not be such a bad thing to read at the beach. I picked up The Casual Vacancy the day before we left for Topsail and didn’t put it down until I’d finished it three days after.

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The Casual Vacancy is a book about Pagford, a small town in England. The story revolves around the death of Barry Fairbrother, a member of the Pagford Parish Council. Barry is loved by everyone and loves everyone in return. He has a big heart, but politically that’s what gets him into trouble. Many years ago, Pagford and Yarvil were friendly neighbor cities, Yarvil being the bigger of the two with a large estate sitting between them. The estate sold lands to Pagford to make cheap housing. Decades later, the cheap housing has become government housing, and is costing Pagford quite a bit of money in the end. Barry wants to keep “the Fields” and the addiction clinic as part of Pagford. The other half of the council does not. When there is a casual vacancy because of Barry’s death, the entire town splits between pro-fielders and anti-fielders and those running for council find themselves the topic of discriminatory posts on the Parish Council website.

What did I tell you, politics with a side of reality tv show worthy gossip! If you like Rowling’s writing style for Harry Potter (this isn’t exactly the same, but it’s not far off) and are interesting in small town politics then I’d definitely give this book a go!

Read “American Gods” if You Liked…

The Percy Jackson series!

American Gods by Neil Gaiman is a novel set in modern day America. It’s about a recently released convict named Shadow who’s hired by a god to be his bodyguard. The story takes many twists and turns as the dead rise back to life, new gods battle old gods, and a storm unlike any other brews in the West.

“Gaiman — who is best known as the creator of the respected DC Comics ‘Sandman’ series — has a deft hand with the mythologies he tinkers with here; even better, he’s a fine, droll storyteller.” -Kera Bolonik, NY Times Books in Brief: Fiction and Poetry

Unlike Rick Riordan’s Percy Jackson series, Gaiman’s novel pulls from the histories of gods all over the world rather than solely Greek culture. Norse, Egyptian, and Hindu gods play a major part in Shadow’s journey across America, as well as the gods of television, video games, and other twenty first century innovations. It’s thrilling, captivating, and thought provoking.

American Gods delves deeper into the past of the United States. “Nobody’s American…at least not originally,” says Gaiman, on the basis of his novel. The story line is geared towards adults, with sex scenes, violence, and vulgar language, but is more of a cultural discussion than a story of good versus evil, which is what Riordan was going for with the children’s series starring Percy Jackson.

xo Bailey